100 items found for ""

  • Angel Food Cake | Usapeec

    Angel Food Cake Yield: 4 (10-inch) tube cakes/48 sandwiches Ingredients Frozen (thawed) or refrigerated liquid egg white or reconstituted dried egg white* Cream of tartar Sugar Vanilla Almond extract Cake flour Sugar Salt Total approximate weight 3 Lb. 8 Oz. Using 3-speed mixer at third speed, mix for 1 minute. 0.6 Oz. 1 Lb. 5 Oz. Mix at second speed for 3-4 minutes while gradually adding sugar until soft peaks form. Blend in. 3 Oz. 0.25 Oz. 1 Lb. 1 Oz. Sift together. Mix in at first speed, 2 cups at a time, just until blended. 1 Lb. 5 Oz. 0.25 Oz. 7 Lb. 7 Oz. *7 oz. dried egg white mixed with 49 oz. water Instructions Divide and portion approximately 1 lb. 14 oz. batter into 4 ungreased tube pans. Bake at 375°F for 30-40 minutes, until tops are golden brown and spring back when touched. Invert and cool completely before slicing.

  • Registered Dietitian/Nutrition | Usapeec

    Registered Dietitian/Nutrition Today’s retail environment is full of nutrition labels, claims, profiling systems and much more. Helping consumers navigate their way through grocery aisles is an important job, and according to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, many Americans are overweight and undernourished. They get too many calories but not enough nutrients each day. The Guidelines further state that the prevalence of obesity in the United States has doubled and in some cases tripled between the 1970s and 2008. What's in an egg? The Yolk: A Nutrient Goldmine

  • Egg Nutrition | Usapeec

    Egg Nutrition Eggs 101 – Egg Nutrition Basics Egg Product Nutrition & Trends Health & Nutrition Modern Eggs for the Modern Women Registered Dietitian/Nutrition An Egg a Day is MORE Than Okay! Eating eggs is a great opportunity for improving health FAQs

  • Frozen Egg Products | Usapeec

    Frozen Egg Products Usage Ingredient especially for the commercial food processing industry. ​ Availability 30 lb container and 4, 5, 8, 10 lb pouches or waxed plastic cartons Commercial - 25 and 50 lb boxes, 150, 175, and 200 lb drums. ​ Advantages Long shelf life, functionality, variety of blends. ​ Processing Overview Shell eggs are washed, rinsed, sanitized, and candled, then broken, monitored for quality and imperfections, and yolks separated from whites by automation. Separation is not necessary if whole eggs are being processed. Egg products are then clarified, filtered, pasteurized and filled into containers and frozen at –10° to –40°F (–23.3° to –40°C). ​ Egg yolks and whole eggs generally must be mixed with sugar, salt, or other edible ingredients such as corn syrup, phosphates, or other carbohydrates, to prevent gelation (increased viscosity) caused by the lipid portion of the lipoproteins in the freeze-thaw cycle. (When the protein molecules interact with each other upon thawing, they form insoluble aggregates that make thawed yolks gel-like and gummy.) ​ Gelation of the yolk or whole egg may be prevented by homogenization and the addition of about 10% sucrose or sodium chloride prior to freezing. Some egg white products contain an ester-type whipping agent such as triethyl citrate. ​ Added Ingredients Citric acid may be added to some yolk or whole egg products to prevent greening. ​ Storage Stored at 0° to –5°F (–17.8° to –20.6°C) frozen eggs can be held for years. Defrost only as much as needed, in unopened containers, in refrigerator or under cold running water. Use defrosted product immediately, or store refrigerated for no longer than three days. With extended storage, some physical changes like coagulation of certain protein fractions of egg whites or gelation of the yolk, may occur. Frozen eggs cannot be refrozen once thawed. Store thawed eggs at the coldest possible refrigerator temperature (40° to 45°F, 4.4° to 7.2°C). ​ Products Whole eggs, whites, or yolks Scrambled egg mix Salted whole eggs or yolks Sugared egg yolks Whole eggs with yolks and corn syrup Whole eggs with citric acid Whole eggs with corn syrup Various blends Products: ​ Whole eggs, whites, or yolks Scrambled egg mix Salted whole eggs or yolks Sugared egg yolks Whole eggs with yolks and corn syrup Whole eggs with citric acid Whole eggs with corn syrup Various blends

  • More about Eggs | Usapeec

    More about Eggs Appearance/ missing eggs Cooking & preparing eggs Disease prevention on commercial farms Egg safety miscellaneous Egg storage and handling Eggs and foodborne illness General egg production questions Using eggs for special occasions

  • Buying & Storing | Usapeec

    Buying & Storing Buying Look for eggs with shells that are clean and unbroken. Buy USDA Grade AA or A shell eggs from refrigerated cases. Do not buy eggs having shells that are dirty, cracked or leaking. Do not buy eggs that are being stored at room temperature. Buy eggs before the Expiration (EXP) or the "Sell-By" date. The EXP date, however, is not federally required. Storing Eggs should never remain out of refrigeration for more than one hour. Eggs that are taken from a refrigerated environment and placed in a warm, humid environment will "sweat", or produce condensation on their shells. This is the perfect medium for the growth of bacteria. ​ Store eggs in their carton, large end up, and on an inside shelf of a refrigerator. The carton helps protect the eggs from picking up odors and flavors from the other foods. In addition, the carton helps to prevent moisture loss. Keep eggs refrigerated at or below a temperature of 2°C to 7°C (35°F to 45°F) until they are to be used. Properly handled and stored eggs rarely spoil. USDA requires eggs to be stored at 7°C (45°C) or lower after processing. Fresh, uncooked shell eggs that have been properly refrigerated will maintain their high-quality for a more extended period of time.

  • Find True Satisfaction | Usapeec

    Find True Satisfaction Eggs possess unique nutritional properties and contribute desirable functional attributes unequaled by any single egg alternative. Eggs also contribute a clean, natural image to help create a consumer -friendly ingredient statement for packaged or prepared foods. ​ Researchers discovered that compared to a bagel-based breakfast of equal weight, the egg breakfast induced greater satiety and significantly reduced the participants' food intake for the rest of the day. ​ Eggs have an impressive macronutrient composition to contribute to their satiety impact. A registered dietitian and culinary instructor at the Institute of Culinary Education in New York called eggs a 'nutritional powerhouse.' And no wonder, eggs provide some of the highest quality protein of any food, as well as being one of the few nondairy sources of vitamin D. ​ For more on the story of egg proteins, independent scientific studies and highlights of the egg's amazing functional properties download the pdf titled: Find True Satisfaction. ​ For information about health and nutrition topics, visit the Egg Nutrition Center at www.enc-online.org

  • Accept No Substitutes | Usapeec

    Accept No Substitutes Eggs possess unique nutritional properties and contribute desirable functional attributes unequaled by any single egg alternative. Eggs also contribute a clean, natural image to help create a consumer-friendly ingredient statement for packaged or prepared foods. ​ Eggs possess unique nutritional properties and contribute desirable functional attributes unequaled by any single egg alternative. New research supports a hypothesis that eggs require more than a simple 1:1 substitution with an egg alternative to acquire similar ingredient functionality in many prepared foods. Eggs also contribute a clean, natural image to help create a consumer-friendly ingredient statement for packaged or prepared foods. Egg products are available liquid, frozen or dried for the convenience of the food formulator. Regardless of form, the egg's nutritional and functional qualities remain intact. When properly stored, egg products will maintain a stable shelf life for months. For information about health and nutrition topics, visit the Egg Nutrition Center at www.enc-online.org

  • What's in An Egg? | Usapeec

    What's in An Egg? What's in an egg? For only 70 calories each, eggs are rich in nutrients. They contain, in varying amounts, almost every essential vitamin and mineral needed by humans as well as several other beneficial food components. Egg protein is the standard by which other protein sources are measured. A large egg contains over six grams of protein. A large egg has 4.5 grams of fat, only 7 percent of the daily value. Only one-third (1.5) grams is saturated fat and 2 grams are mono-unsaturated fat. ​ ​ ​ Nutrition Facts - Large Egg We applaud retailers taking steps to ensure that consumers are educated about the foods available to them and have an easy-to-understand, transparent way of assessing the health attributes of the foods they eat. And, we believe that eggs are a nutritional powerhouse people should know about when making food choices.

  • Pregnancy and Infant Nutritional Needs | Usapeec

    Pregnancy and Infant Nutritional Needs A dequate nutrition, even as early as 8 weeks before pregnancy begins, can help to ensure proper growth during critical stages of embryonic and fetal development and maintain optimal health of the mother as well. Vitamin needs increase considerably during pregnancy. Certain vitamins such as folate and vitamin B6, and minerals such as iron and iodide, are needed in quantities nearly double that of nonpregnant females due to their involvement in cell metabolism and reproduction. Other nutrients newly found to be essential for health are not yet classified as either vitamin or mineral but have been shown to be necessary for promotion of normal development of the fetus into infancy and beyond. ​ Choline is an essential nutrient that is associated with memory storage and muscle control. Choline metabolism is closely inter-related with the metabolism of folate and vitamin B12 to produce the amino acid methionine from homocysteine. Eggs are an excellent dietary source of choline, which in laboratory studies has been shown to enhance fetal brain development and memory function even into old age. The carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, also found in eggs, have been found to protect eyes from illness associated with vision loss in the elderly. ​ Eggs contribute many B vitamins including folate and vitamin B6 as well as a readily absorbable form of iron. It is well known that severe iron deficiency in pregnancy, especially during the first half of pregnancy, may lead to preterm delivery, low birth weight, and increased risk for fetal death in the first weeks after birth. ​ Most recently, research has indicated that egg yolks are a good food source of absorbable iron for infants even after the first 4-6 months when their fetal stores of iron becomes depleted and dietary iron is essential for continued health. In a new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (June 2002), both breastfed and formula fed infants age 6 to 12 months who consumed egg yolks had improved iron status when compared with infants that did not have egg yolks. In fact, this study also found that antibody levels specific to egg yolk or egg white were no higher for the group that received the egg yolks. Other recent findings have shown that infants who consumed adequate amounts of vitamin D had an 80% lower risk of developing diabetes. Again, eggs are one of the few foods that are a natural dietary source of vitamin D.