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  • Home | Usapeec

    " What is World Egg Day?" ​ World Egg Day falls on the second Friday of October every year... ​ Read More... Shell Eggs USDA standards are used throughout the U.S. industry to classify shell eggs into three consumer grades… Processed Eggs Direct from Mother Nature, with a touch of modern technology that cracks, separates and packages convenient forms of whole eggs whites and yolks, egg products provide food formulators with important benefits… Egg and Egg Product Safety The 1970 Egg Products Inspection Act requires that all egg products distributed for consumption be pasteurized… Egg Nutrition An Egg a Day is MORE Than Okay… More about Eggs What is double yolk eggs? How are they formed?... Recipes Eggs can incredibly fit into meals of any daypart. Get inspired using our chef-created recipes… About Us Supported by American Egg Board (AEB), this website is targeted to serve as an information portal of U.S. eggs and egg products… ​

  • testing | Usapeec

    Packaging Packaging U.S. eggs are primarily packaged on plastics or fiber trays that hold 30 eggs. Filled trays are then packed into cases that hold 360 eggs (30 dozen), a capacity that is universal throughout the industry and is used to tra n refrigerated containers aboard ocean-going vessels. Capacities of refrigerated container are as follows: nsport and store shell eggs. Eggs are shipped by refrigerated trucks or i

  • Mini Quiches | Usapeec

    Mini Quiches Yield: 4 (2-quiche) servings CRUST Ingredients All-purpose flour Shortening Cold water Salt Total approximate weight 1 Lb. 6 Oz. Using 3-speed mixer at first speed, mix for 1 minute. 1 Lb. 2 Oz. 10 Oz. Add. 0.5 Oz. 3 Lb. 0.25 Oz. Instructions Mix on first speed until dough is formed. Cover and refrigerate 30-45 minutes. Portion into .5-oz. balls. Roll into 3-inch circles. Press each into quarter-cup size mini-muffin tins. FILLING Ingredients Finely shredded cheese (Swiss, Mozzarella, Cheddar, Provolone) Fully-cooked minced bacon or ham Frozen (thawed) or refrigerated liquid whole egg or reconsititued dried whole egg* Milk Onion salt Total approximate weight 12 Oz. Blend. 12 Oz. 1 Lb. 2 Oz. Using 3-speed mixer at first speed, mix for 30 seconds. 36 Oz. 25 Oz. 4 Lb. 14.25 Oz. *4.5 oz. dried whole egg mixed with 13.5 oz. water Instructions Portion 1 tablespoon bacon-cheese mixture topped with 1 tablespoon (.5 oz.) custard into each of 96 pastry-lined muffin cups. Bake at 350°F for 18-22 minutes, until puffed and firm to touch. Substitute 12 oz. finely chopped steamed broccoli or pressed spinach for bacon. Vegetable Quiche:

  • Summer Berries | Usapeec

    Summer Berries with Pavlova and Passion Fruit Sauce Ingredients Sugar Water U.S. Liquid Egg White Icing Sugar Strawberry Raspberry Blueberry Raspberry Sauce Passion Fruit Sauce Double Cream (whipped) Mint Leaf 150 g 50 g 200 g 200 g 50 g 50 g 50 g 50 g 50 g 100 g 1 pc Method Boil water and sugar until 128°C. Whip egg white until a firm snow is obtained. Pour the hot syrup into the egg white. ​ Add icing sugar and slowly stir the mixture well. ​ Brush a rectangular mould with some oil. Place a baking sheet on the baking tray, then pipe the mixture from step 2 into the mould. Remove the mould and dust with icing sugar on top. Baked in the oven for about 140°C for 30 minutes. ​ Place the pavlova on a long plate, dust on top with icing sugar and around the plate. Cut each strawberry into four pieces, add in raspberry and blueberry, then mix with raspberry sauce. ​ Spoon berries on the top of the pavlova and a spoon of passion fruit sauce over the fruit and around the plate. Lastly scoop a spoon of double cream on top of the berries with a piece of mint leaf.

  • Earl Grey Tea Chocolate Pudding | Usapeec

    Earl Grey Tea Chocolate Pudding with Butter Caramel and Vanilla Sauce Ingredients Earl Grey Tea Filling Earl Grey tea leaves Cream Milk U.S. Liquid Egg Yolk Sugar Dark chocolate White bread (sliced) Butter (melted) 10 g 300 g 300 g 150 g 95 g 100 g 250 g 150 g Butter Caramel sauce Cream Vanilla Stick Granulated Sugar Glucose Syrup Butter 500 g 1 pc 112 g 112 g 58 g Method Boil cream, milk and Earl Grey tea together. Set aside for a few minutes to ensure of a strong flavour, then strain it. Mix egg yolks and sugar, add in mixture from Step 1 and boil again until 85°C. Pour in the dark chocolate and mix well. Then strain again and ready to be used. Cut white bread into littlesquares, pour the melting butter and mix well. Put it in over at low temperature of about 120°C for 30 minutes until it turns brown colour. Wrap the stainless ring with luminium foil at the bottom. Add a little bit of butter bread crumbles inside, then pour the Earl Grey tea filling, and bake in the oven at 150°C until set. Repeat this step until the ring is almost filled. After finish baking, let cool and keep it in the refrigerator until cold. ​ Butter Caramel Sauce Soak the vanilla bean in the cream for two hours. Melt the glucose and the sugar until it caramelised. Turn off the heat, add in the vanilla bean cream and cool the mixture until it reaches 40°C. Add the softly whipped butter and mix well. ​ Earl Grey Tea Chocolate Pudding Take out the Earl Grey tea pudding from the refrigerator, remove the aluminium foil and place it on a plate. Pour the caramel sauce on top and a little vanilla sauce surrounding the plate. Add a little garnish of butter bread crumbles on the pudding and around the plate.

  • Egg and Egg Product Safety | Usapeec

    Egg and Egg Product Safety E gg can be part of a healthy diet. However, they are perishable just like raw meat, poultry and fish. To be safe, they must be properly refrigerated and cooked. Egg Product Safety Pasteurized Egg Products' Impressive Safety Record Taking Steps at Home Frequently Asked Questions

  • Converting Shell Eggs to Egg Products? | Usapeec

    Converting Shell Eggs to Egg Products? Thinking about converting from shell eggs to liquid or dried eggs? ​ Converting from shell eggs to liquid or dried eggs in your formulas is really quite easy and won’t affect your bowl cost. It’s simply a weight for weight substitution. ​ Other conversion benefits: Saves time, labor and waste Reduces cold storage space needed Increases shelf life – simplifies inventory tracking Streamlines ingredient preparation Provides batch-to-batch consistency Improves long-term product quality ​ ​ Watch as the baking experts at AIB International show you just how easy it is to adjust your formula to use liquid or dried eggs. Refer one of the worksheets to get started. Converting from shell eggs to liquid eggs 1️⃣ Whole Shell Eggs to Liquid Whole Eggs Liquid whole eggs can be easily used in place of whole shell eggs in your formulations. For each formulation, simply calculate the average weight of the whole shell eggs used to determine how much liquid whole eggs are needed. ​ Steps to determine the average weight of the whole shell eggs in your formulation: ​ Put empty container on scale and tare to zero. Crack required number of whole shell eggs into container. Enter weight of the whole shell eggs on line below. Repeat steps (1 to 3) four more times. Compute the average of the five weights. ​ Conversion Tips: ​ Calculations are the same whether ounces or grams are used as the unit of measure. Shell eggs used in measurement calculations may be used within a day or two if kept refrigerated. ​ Find the Replacement Liquid Whole Eggs Weight: Record the number of whole shell eggs in your formulation _______ Weight from 1 to 5 Total Weight _______ ÷ 5 = _______ Replacement liquid whole eggs weight (average weight) 2️⃣ Shell Egg Whites to Liquid Egg Whites Liquid egg whites can be easily used in place of shell egg whites in your formulations. For each formulation, simply calculate the average weight of the shell egg whites used to determine how much liquid egg whites are needed. ​ Steps to determine the average weight of the shell egg whites in your formulation: ​ Put empty container on scale and tare to zero. Crack required number of whole shell eggs into container. Enter weight of the whole shell eggs on line below. Repeat steps (1 to 3) four more times. Compute the average of the five weights. ​ Conversion Tips: ​ Calculations are the same whether ounces or grams are used as the unit of measure. Shell eggs used in measurement calculations may be used within a day or two if kept refrigerated. ​ Find the Replacement Liquid Egg Whites Weight: Record the number of shell egg whites in your formulation _______ Weight from 1 to 5 Total Weight _______ ÷ 5 = _______ Replacement liquid egg whites weight (average weight) 3️⃣ Shell Egg Yolks to Liquid Egg Yolks Liquid egg yolks can be easily used in place of shell egg yolks in your formulations. For each formulation, simply calculate the average weight of the shell egg yolks used to determine how much liquid egg yolks are needed. ​ Steps to determine the average weight of the shell egg yolks in your formulation: ​ Put empty container on scale and tare to zero. Crack required number of whole shell eggs into container. Enter weight of the whole shell eggs on line below. Repeat steps (1 to 3) four more times. Compute the average of the five weights. ​ Conversion Tips: ​ Calculations are the same whether ounces or grams are used as the unit of measure. Shell eggs used in measurement calculations may be used within a day or two if kept refrigerated. ​ Find the Replacement Liquid Egg Yolks Weight: Record the number of shell egg yolks in your formulation _______ Weight from 1 to 5 Total Weight _______ ÷ 5 = _______ Replacement liquid egg yolks weight (average weight) Converting from liquid eggs to shell eggs 1️⃣ Liquid Whole Eggs to Dried Whole Eggs Since liquid whole eggs are composed of about 75% water, you’ll need to determine two amounts for each formulation conversion—the equivalent weight in dried whole eggs AND the water needed. ​ Dried Whole Eggs Calculation: Divide the weight of liquid whole eggs currently in your formulation by 4 to determine the weight of dried whole eggs needed. _________ (Weight of liquid whole eggs) ÷ 4 = _________ (Weight of dried whole eggs) Water Calculation: Multiply the weight of dried whole eggs by 3 to determine the weight of water needed. _________ (Weight of dried whole eggs) x 3 = _________ (Weight of water needed) Note: Calculations are the same whether ounces or grams are used as the unit of measure. C heck Your Work: Check to see if your calculations are correct by adding together the weight of the dried whole eggs and the weight of the water. If this equals the original weight of your liquid whole eggs, your calculations are correct. _________ (Weight of dried whole eggs) + _________ (Weight of water) = _________ (Weight of liquid whole eggs) Conversion Tips: If you use shell whole eggs and would like to know the average weight of whole eggs in your formulation, please download one of our shell whole eggs to liquid whole eggs worksheets before using this sheet. Dried whole eggs can be blended with other dry ingredients and refrigerated at 32° to 50°F (0° to 10°C) in tightly sealed container until ready for use. If dried whole eggs need to be rehydrated separately for your formulation, it is recommended that a small amount of the sugar or other carbohydrate from your formula be blended into the dried whole eggs prior to adding water. This will help prevent lumping when mixing with water. 2️⃣ Liquid Egg Whites to Dried Egg Whites Since liquid egg whites are composed of about 88% water, you’ll need to determine two amounts for each formulation conversion—the equivalent weight in dried egg whites AND the water needed. ​ Dried Egg Whites Calculation: Multiply the weight of liquid egg whites currently in your formulation by .12 to determine the weight of dried egg whites needed. _________ (Weight of liquid egg whites) x .12 = _________ (Weight of dried egg whites) Water Calculation: Multiply the weight of dried egg whites by .88 to determine the weight of water needed. _________ (Weight of dried egg whites) x .88 = _________ (Weight of water needed) Note: Calculations are the same whether ounces or grams are used as the unit of measure. Check Your Work: Check to see if your calculations are correct by adding together the weight of the dried egg whites and the weight of the water. If this equals the original weight of your liquid egg whites, your calculations are correct. _________ (Weight of dried egg whites) + _________ (Weight of water) = _________ (Weight of liquid egg whites) Conversion Tips: If you use shell whole eggs and would like to know the average weight of whole eggs in your formulation, please download one of our shell whole eggs to liquid whole eggs worksheets before using this sheet. Dried whole eggs can be blended with other dry ingredients and refrigerated at 32° to 50°F (0° to 10°C) in tightly sealed container until ready for use. If dried whole eggs need to be rehydrated separately for your formulation, it is recommended that a small amount of the sugar or other carbohydrate from your formula be blended into the dried whole eggs prior to adding water. This will help prevent lumping when mixing with water. 3️⃣ Liquid Egg Yolks to Dried Egg Yolks Since liquid egg yolks are composed of about 55% water, you’ll need to determine two amounts for each formulation conversion—the equivalent weight in dried egg yolks AND the water needed. ​ Dried Egg Yolks Calculation: Multiply the weight of liquid egg yolks currently in your formulation by .45 to determine the weight of dried egg yolks needed. _________ (Weight of liquid egg yolks) ÷.45 = _________ (Weight of dried egg yolks) Water Calculation: Multiply the weight of dried egg yolks by .55 to determine the weight of water needed. _________ (Weight of dried egg yolks) x .55 = _________ (Weight of water needed) Note: Calculations are the same whether ounces or grams are used as the unit of measure. Check Your Work: Check to see if your calculations are correct by adding together the weight of the dried egg yolks and the weight of the water. If this equals the original weight of your liquid egg yolks, your calculations are correct. _________ (Weight of dried egg yolks) + _________ (Weight of water) = _________ (Weight of liquid egg yolks) Conversion Tips: If you use shell whole eggs and would like to know the average weight of whole eggs in your formulation, please download one of our shell whole eggs to liquid whole eggs worksheets before using this sheet. Dried whole eggs can be blended with other dry ingredients and refrigerated at 32° to 50°F (0° to 10°C) in tightly sealed container until ready for use. If dried whole eggs need to be rehydrated separately for your formulation, it is recommended that a small amount of the sugar or other carbohydrate from your formula be blended into the dried whole eggs prior to adding water. This will help prevent lumping when mixing with water.

  • World Egg Day | Usapeec

    World Egg Day What Is World Egg Day? World Egg Day falls on the second Friday of October every year, when more than 40 countries around the world celebrate the food marvel that is The Incredible Egg! Versatile, affordable, delicious and nutritious — see how The Incredible Egg offers sustainable nutrition to help feed the world … ​ Every day, egg farmers across the globe join together in their commitment to provide high-quality eggs to help feed the world’s hungry. Here at home, America’s egg farmers continue to balance their operations with firm commitments to the people they feed, the animals they care for and the environment we all share. Dozens of Flavors, One Incredible Egg ​ Eggs are a universal food and an important part of cuisines around the globe. Every culture has its own recipes for egg dishes. Although some of these dishes have different names and often include different flavors, many are similar. Read on to find out how people eat eggs around the world. ​ We think of the omelet we eat in the U.S. today as an original French recipe, but it was first made out of eggs and honey by ancient Romans. Make this type of omelet by moving beaten eggs around in a pan until they cook into a lumpy circle. After adding a filling, flip one side of the egg circle over the filling and the omelet is done. Omelets: Similar to omelets, cook the filling in a pan and pour the beaten eggs over them. Let the dish cook until the eggs are almost set. To finish the top, cover the pan and let steam set the eggs or put the pan in the oven or under the broiler. In both ancient Persia and modern Iran, an herb-flavored omelet called coucou sabzi is made in the very same way. Frittatas and Tortillas: ​ Chinese egg foo yung is very much like a frittata or a tortilla. However, egg foo yung comes out shaped like a patty because it’s made in the bottom of a wok. In Japan, thin omelets are made in a rectangular pan and rolled up tightly. In several Asian countries, thin omelets are sometimes cut into strips before being mixed with other foods or made with lacy holes so the filling foods show through. Eggs in Asia: A famous dish showing how foods of different lands are similar is a light, thin, egg-rich pancake. To the French, this pancake is a crepe. There are similar pancakes in other cuisines, including the Jewish blintz, Russian blini, Greek krepand, and Hungarian palascinta. The Chinese also use a light, thin egg pancake to wrap egg rolls and make won tons. Thin, omelet-like pancakes from Korea and Indonesia are often used as wrappers for other foods, too. Pancakes, Crepes, Blintz and More: ​ ​ Celebrate World Egg Day with the foods and flavors that unite us all. Check out our collection of and get inspired. Recipes

  • About Us | Usapeec

    About Us Supported by the American Egg Board (AEB), the research, education and promotion arm of the U.S. egg industry, this website is targeted to serve as an information portal of U.S. eggs and egg products. Questions concerning specific products or the supply sources for U.S. eggs and egg products should be directed to the USA Poultry & Egg Export Council at below office: Thanks for your summission! Submit USA Poultry & Egg Export Council Hong Kong Office (covers China, Hong Kong and Taiwan) Room 1310, Olympia Plaza 243-255 King’s Road North Point, Hong Kong Tel: 852-2890-2908 Fax: 852-2895-5546 E-mail: hkoffice@usapeec.com.hk Related Links ​ American Egg Board: https://www.aeb.org/ ​ Egg Nutrition Centre: https://www.eggnutritioncenter.org/ ​ The Incredible Egg: https://www.incredibleegg.org/ ​ USA Poultry & Egg Export Council: www.usapeec.org

  • Taking Steps at Home | Usapeec

    Taking Steps at Home Proper refrigeration, cooking, and handling should prevent most egg safety problems. Persons can enjoy eggs and dishes containing eggs if these safe handling guidelines are followed. 1. Don't Eat Raw Eggs This includes "health-food" milk shakes with raw eggs, Caesar salad, Hollandaise sauce, and any other foods like homemade mayonnaise, ice cream, or eggnog made from recipes in which the raw egg ingredients are not cooked. ​ 2. Buy Clean Eggs At the store, choose Grade A or AA eggs with clean, uncracked shells. Make sure they've been refrigerated in the store. Any bacteria present in an egg can multiply quickly at room temperature. Don't wash eggs. At the plant, government regulations require that USDA-graded eggs be carefully washed and sanitized using special detergent. Then the eggs are coated with a tasteless, natural mineral oil to protect them. ​ 3. Refrigerate Eggs Take eggs straight home and store them immediately in the refrigerator set at 40ºF or slightly below. Store them in the grocery carton in the coldest part of the refrigerator and not in the door. ​ 4. Use Eggs Within Recommended Times Use raw shell eggs within 3 to 5 weeks. Hard-cooked eggs will keep refrigerated for 1 week. Use leftover yolks and whites within 4 days. If eggs crack on the way home from the store, break them into a clean container, cover it tightly, and keep refrigerated for use within 2 days. 5. Freeze Eggs for Longer Storage Eggs should not be frozen in their shells. To freeze whole eggs, beat yolks and whites together. Egg whites can be frozen by themselves. Use frozen eggs within a year. If eggs freeze accidentally in their shells, keep them frozen until needed. Defrost them in the refrigerator. Discard any with cracked shells. ​ 6. Handle Eggs Safely Wash hands, utensils, equipment, and work areas with warm, soapy water before and after contact with eggs and dishes containing eggs. Don't keep eggs -- including Easter eggs -- out of the refrigerator more than 2 hours. Serve cooked eggs and dishes containing eggs immediately after cooking, or place in shallow containers for quick cooling and refrigerate at once for later use. Use within 3 to 4 days. ​ 7. Cook Eggs Many cooking methods can be used to cook eggs safely including poaching, hard cooking, scrambling, frying, and baking. However, eggs must be cooked thoroughly until yolks are firm. Scrambled eggs should not be runny. Casseroles and other dishes containing eggs should be cooked to 160ºF as measured with a food thermometer. ​ 8. Use Safe Egg Recipes Egg mixtures are safe if they reach 160ºF, so homemade ice cream and eggnog can be made safely from a cooked base. Heat the egg-milk mixture gently. Use a food thermometer to check the temperature or use a metal spoon (the mixture should coat the spoon). If in-shell pasteurized eggs are available, they can be used safely in recipes that won't be cooked. Dry meringue shells are safe. So are divinity candy and 7-minute frosting, made by combining hot sugar syrup with beaten egg whites. Meringue-topped pies should be safe if baked at 350ºF for about 15 minutes. Chiffon pies and fruit whips made with raw, beaten egg whites cannot be guaranteed safe. Substitute whipped cream or whipped topping. To make key lime pie safely, heat the lime (or lemon) juice with the raw egg yolks in a pan on the stove, stirring constantly, until the mixture reaches 160ºF. Then combine it with the sweetened condensed milk and pour it into a baked pie crust. Cook egg dishes such as quiche and casseroles to 160ºF as measured with a food thermometer. ​